Wednesday, April 11, 2012

#BookReview: The Wife of Reilly - Jennifer Coburn

Prudence Malone is not very likable.  She thinks she is, but she really isn't.  Married to a perfectly good man, Reilly, she ditches him after a chance encounter with her college boyfriend at a homecoming game.  I knew from the minute they reunited that there were going to be all kinds of shenanigans, but I'm just the reader so what do I know?

Like I said, Prudence returns to Ann Arbor to reunite with her best friends from college and hopes that she'll run across Matt.  This would be the same man that she never heard from after they graduated college, but you know how you recreate events in your mind as you wish they were instead of how they really were?  That would be Prudence.  Anywho, she does run into Matt, who is just as hot as she remembered, realizes he is the man for her (even though she's married), and decides that the only way she can leave her husband without feeling guilty is to find him a new wife.

Seems a bit far fetched, right?  It is, but the scenes in which she scouts out potential wives for her current husband are some of the best.  Prudence's friends are a motley, if stereotypical cast: "exotic" (exaggerated eye roll) Jennifer, independent Sophie, and Chad and Daniel, the gay men that own the art gallery above which she stays.    These characters make the scenes work and bring humor to each situation.

Had the aforementioned characters not been involved, Prudence alone would have been enough to make me ditch the book.  She was just annoying.  It's hard for me to like characters that are really smart in most areas of their lives and dumb as a box of rocks in others.  So yes, it was difficult to empathize with this character and her story.  I really wanted to love this story, but really?






304pp
Published: January 2004


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